Write Fielder

Clicks Dig the Long Blog.

Posts tagged newspapers

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126/366 There isn’t a better way to spend my furlough day than cleaning out the desk — and what should I find? Why it’s the letter offering me a job at the dearly departed Rocky Mountain News (RIP). It days my start date is Dec. 18, 11 days after my wedding. What a pleasant surprise. (Taken with instagram)

126/366 There isn’t a better way to spend my furlough day than cleaning out the desk — and what should I find? Why it’s the letter offering me a job at the dearly departed Rocky Mountain News (RIP). It days my start date is Dec. 18, 11 days after my wedding. What a pleasant surprise. (Taken with instagram)

Filed under newspapers rocky mountain news denver project 365+

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118/366 Found in the deep, deep recesses of my trunk this afternoon: a copy of this June 24, 2005 edition of The New York Times, preserved in its blue wrapper. The paper includes a review of “Bewitched,” the movie, and a New York Mets story discussing a tour of Philadelphia’s home to get ideas for the new Queens stadium the Mets were planning. The action photo is of Cliff Floyd. (Taken with instagram)

118/366 Found in the deep, deep recesses of my trunk this afternoon: a copy of this June 24, 2005 edition of The New York Times, preserved in its blue wrapper. The paper includes a review of “Bewitched,” the movie, and a New York Mets story discussing a tour of Philadelphia’s home to get ideas for the new Queens stadium the Mets were planning. The action photo is of Cliff Floyd. (Taken with instagram)

Filed under new york times project 365+ newspapers

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Carr: When Truth Survives Free Speech

Journalism has experienced a universe of positives as a result of social media and the proliferation of Twitter, Facebook and other online sources as a suped-up vehicle for news. Accountability is on the rise. Scoops, while sometimes poached, are more often shared. Important stories reach broader audiences than ever. One corrosive negative, however, is the fact that professionally trained journalists and gifted, inventive bloggers often have the same platform as an agenda-spewing hack.

In short: All of our soap boxes are the same height now.

Heck, I recently saw a cable news network quoting Tweets using handles. We don’t even require people to sign their opinions anymore with a name. That’s a blank check for blowhards.

Ink used to bring a clear gravity to the truthfulness of the information. Pixels lack that same weight and often are like dandelion seeds floating through the Internet and looking for a place to land, take root and multiply. The level playing field has had an unfortunate effect. It should be a meritocracy. It’s not. Instead of driving readers to news sources that prove they can be trusted — the august newspapers, the nightly news, etc. — free-range bloggers have actually undermined the media, all of it, mainstream or otherwise. No one questions just the individual’s ethics or facts; rather they question the whole industry. In The New York Times article by David Carr linked above, the subject of an aggressive blogger’s attacks sums it perfectly:

“I view our case as a blow for the First Amendment,” said Mr. Padrick. “If defamatory speech is allowed just because it is on the Internet, it cheapens the value of journalism and makes it less worthy of protection.”

Cheapens is one verb. Weakens would be another. He’s hauntingly correct.

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Filed under journalism newspapers social media david carr