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196/366 July 17. I arose early to catch a morning sneak preview of The Dark Knight Rises, thanks to a friend in the radio biz who knows my fondness for the Batman comic books. It was a tense, stressful, challenging, and completely epic film. I will rise to see it several morning times. (Taken with Instagram)

196/366 July 17. I arose early to catch a morning sneak preview of The Dark Knight Rises, thanks to a friend in the radio biz who knows my fondness for the Batman comic books. It was a tense, stressful, challenging, and completely epic film. I will rise to see it several morning times. (Taken with Instagram)

Filed under batman the dark knight rises comics project 365+

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Boy Wonder rewrites a Christmas classic

The holiday spirit has its claws in Ian, my 5-year-old son, and he has embraced a favorite seasonal song. He can’t get through it without laughing. You know it. It starts: “Jingle bells, Batman smells/Robin laid an egg … “

But this being Ian, the boy wonder and superhero fanatic, if there’s one Christmas song about superheroes that makes him chuckle well then why not four, five or six more. The other night as he fought sleep, Ian decided to invent additional verses for the “Batman smells” classic, riffing on all sorts of heroes. Here are his new songs:

CAPTAIN AMERICA

Jingle bells, Captain America smells

Bucky cracked an egg.

Capmobile lost a wheel.

And Red Skull got away, hey!

HULK

Jingle bells, Hulk smells

Red Hulk smashed an egg.

Hulkvan lost a wheel

And Abomination got away, hey!

SPIDER-MAN

Jingle bells, Spider-Man smells

Ice-Man froze an egg.*

SpideyMobile lost a wheel.

Green Goblin got away, hey!

* He went with Ice-Man as Spidey’s “sidekick” because of that cartoon “Spider-Man and His Amazing Friends” from the early 1980s. I’m one proud papa.

X-MEN

Jingle bells, Cyclops smells

Wolverine sliced an egg.

X-plane lost a wing

And Magneto got away, hey!

HAWKEYE/AVENGERS

Jingle bells, Hawkeye smells

Mockingbird laid an egg.

Hawkmobile lost a wheel.

And Ultron got away, hey!

THOR

Jingle bells, Thor smells

Odin lost his eye.

The Thormobile lost a wheel

And Loki got away

So if you’re going caroling this weekend or at all this season perhaps you’d like to drop one of Ian’s new tunes into your canon. I suggested that maybe he should pick some more well-known superheroes for his variations — maybe Superman or Green Lantern.

"Marvel now, daddy," he said. "We’ll get to DC later."

Filed under the quotable ian spider-man comics batman thor

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“The Greatest Comic Ever." That’s what Baseball Prospectus called the DC Comics issue that included the above panels. It’s got baseball. It’s got superheroes playing baseball. It’s got superheroes playing baseball against super-villains! Why, of course, it’s the greatest ever. DC Super Stars No. 10 was published in 1976, and the cover story was “The Great Super-Star Game.” The cover itself featured Superman and Batman superimposed over a baseball and slugging their arch enemies while yelling the textbook baseball pun (“Strike one! Strike two!”). The Comic Treadmill describes best what readers found inside:

To call the plot pure genius fails to do it justice. A team of  super-heroes plays baseball against a team of super-villains. This ought  to be a series. Or at least a Strat-O-Matic set.  Only three creative talents could have handled this one and lucky for  us, those three guys were on the job as Bob “Babe” Rozakis, Dick “Duke”  Dillin and Julius “Casey” Schwartz, along with inker Frank “Catfish”  McLaughlin delivered this gem.

Back in 2005 — 2005! how did it take so long to uncover this delight! — The Comic Treadmill spent three months recreating the game. While all nine innings are not faithfully detailed within the story, the book does include a play-by-play of the game at the end. The Comic Treadmill dutifully created the game in entries from May 19, 2005 to Aug. 15, 2005. As Larry Granillo wrote at Baseball Prospectus about the Treadmill’s 12-part epic on the greatest game ever: “It’s the kind of thing Pulitzer’s are made of and something every baseball fan should read.”
After all, how else would you know that Green Arrow, the third baseman (of course), had to shoot down a ball that had suddenly sprouted wings in order to get an out? Or, that Joker started at catcher so he could be in the best position to heckle the heroes? Or, that Batman, in the scene featured above, would just miss a grand slam in the fifth panel before taking a bases-loaded walk and pushing home Superman? Or, that Superman, the pitcher, was batting ninth despite his obvious raw power? Clearly, Tony La Russa wasn’t managing the heroes.
And in the end, it’s the heroes that have to cheat to win.
(Though I don’t think Lex Luthor’s vibrating bat would be as easily hid by his larcenous teammates as, say, Albert Belle’s corked bat was.)
Green Arrow finishes the game with four RBIs. Batman went 5-for-5 but did not score a run. Superman allowed 10 runs (all earned) on 17 hits in his complete-game. And the villains’ captain, Sportsmaster, went 3-for-4 with five RBIs and a home run off Supes. He hit ninth, too. We know all this because the comic comes with a box score — and fitting for the greatest comic ever the box score is quite possibly the greatest box score ever. This is why Henry Chadwick invented it.
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The Greatest Comic Ever." That’s what Baseball Prospectus called the DC Comics issue that included the above panels. It’s got baseball. It’s got superheroes playing baseball. It’s got superheroes playing baseball against super-villains! Why, of course, it’s the greatest ever. DC Super Stars No. 10 was published in 1976, and the cover story was “The Great Super-Star Game.” The cover itself featured Superman and Batman superimposed over a baseball and slugging their arch enemies while yelling the textbook baseball pun (“Strike one! Strike two!”). The Comic Treadmill describes best what readers found inside:

To call the plot pure genius fails to do it justice. A team of super-heroes plays baseball against a team of super-villains. This ought to be a series. Or at least a Strat-O-Matic set. Only three creative talents could have handled this one and lucky for us, those three guys were on the job as Bob “Babe” Rozakis, Dick “Duke” Dillin and Julius “Casey” Schwartz, along with inker Frank “Catfish” McLaughlin delivered this gem.

Back in 2005 — 2005! how did it take so long to uncover this delight! — The Comic Treadmill spent three months recreating the game. While all nine innings are not faithfully detailed within the story, the book does include a play-by-play of the game at the end. The Comic Treadmill dutifully created the game in entries from May 19, 2005 to Aug. 15, 2005. As Larry Granillo wrote at Baseball Prospectus about the Treadmill’s 12-part epic on the greatest game ever: “It’s the kind of thing Pulitzer’s are made of and something every baseball fan should read.”

After all, how else would you know that Green Arrow, the third baseman (of course), had to shoot down a ball that had suddenly sprouted wings in order to get an out? Or, that Joker started at catcher so he could be in the best position to heckle the heroes? Or, that Batman, in the scene featured above, would just miss a grand slam in the fifth panel before taking a bases-loaded walk and pushing home Superman? Or, that Superman, the pitcher, was batting ninth despite his obvious raw power? Clearly, Tony La Russa wasn’t managing the heroes.

And in the end, it’s the heroes that have to cheat to win.

(Though I don’t think Lex Luthor’s vibrating bat would be as easily hid by his larcenous teammates as, say, Albert Belle’s corked bat was.)

Green Arrow finishes the game with four RBIs. Batman went 5-for-5 but did not score a run. Superman allowed 10 runs (all earned) on 17 hits in his complete-game. And the villains’ captain, Sportsmaster, went 3-for-4 with five RBIs and a home run off Supes. He hit ninth, too. We know all this because the comic comes with a box score — and fitting for the greatest comic ever the box score is quite possibly the greatest box score ever. This is why Henry Chadwick invented it.

-30-

Filed under baseball comics batman superman

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We should totally get that. I’ll put that on my Santa list — The Religional Batman. I don’t know how to write that word. You’ll help me spell ‘religional’ right?
Dark Knight obsessed Ian, the 5-year-old boy wonder, in all his malapropism glory Thursday when told there is a Season 2 of his new favorite cartoon Batman: The Animated Series.

Filed under batman santa the quotable ian comics